Wednesday, June 13, 2007

Big firm salaries in Miami

Above the law covers Miami salaries here.

From an April DBR article:

Playing its hand in the South Florida associate pay stakes, Greenberg Traurig raised the starting base salaries of its rookie lawyers in Miami and Fort Lauderdale to $135,000 and their total compensation packages to more than $150,000....
The base salary of Greenberg’s first-year lawyers now will match that of White & Case, which in February announced that it had raised first-year salaries to $135,000 in Miami.
Holland & Knight, Hogan & Hartson and Akerman Senterfitt recently raised salaries for rookie lawyers to $130,000 in South Florida.
Hunton & Williams has raised its first-year salaries to $145,000 in Miami. Two New York-based firms, Weil Gotshal & Manges and Boies Schiller & Flexner, pay first-years $160,000 in their South Florida offices.



Any thoughts?

8 comments:

SWLiP said...

Somebody bring me a buck, as I think I'm going to throw up.

... Ahh. That's better.

SWLiP said...

Er, that's "bucket".

Paul D. Cravath said...

They're worth every penney. After all, wouldn't you entrust your most important legal affairs to someone who can't even find the courthouse, has never so much as handled a motion hearing, probably has no clue how to negotiate anything more than their benefits package -- and, statistically, will be gone from the firm in just a few years.

Anonymous said...

hey paul d.
i bet they know how to spell "penny" - maybe that is why you need them

Anonymous said...

Ouch!

Paul D. Cravath said...

I spell better than you will when you've been dead, like me, for over 70 years. Now that you got past the spell-check, do you disagree with the rest of my from-the-grave analysis of salaries for the untrained, untested, transients who will enter and leave these firms before the end of the decade?

Anonymous said...

paul d.
you seem to be on the money on your substance - in a reality-based world, the amount of money paid to new associates is absurd. on the other hand, the firms are going to get their money's worth out of these kids, and they do want most of them to eventually leave. they certainly don't want an army of new partners to share their wealth. the smart young associate will make some big money, pay off their loans, bank some, and then go do something worthwhile with their lives, in or out of law, including getting a job that let's them have a life with their spouse and kids, if they have them

Anonymous said...

but do these young associates get the chance to have problems introducing documents at trial using the elmo?